Comparative study of postpositions in Mongolian dialects and the written language.
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Comparative study of postpositions in Mongolian dialects and the written language. by Frederick Holden Buck

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Published by Harvard University Press in Cambridge .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Mongolian language -- Grammar.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesPostpositions in Mongolian dialects and the written language.
SeriesHarvard-Yenching Institute studies,, 12
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPL409 .B8
The Physical Object
Paginationxvii, 158 p.
Number of Pages158
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6174409M
LC Control Number55005384
OCLC/WorldCa3876953

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Buck, Frederick Holden Comparative Study of Postpositions in Mongolian Dialects and the Written Language. Mongolian is the official language of Mongolia and both the most widely spoken and best-known member of the Mongolic language number of speakers across all its dialects may be million, including the vast majority of the residents of Mongolia and many of the ethnic Mongol residents of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of the People's Republic of ts: Khalkha, Chakhar, Khorchin, Kharchin, . Language: English. Brand new Book. This book is written to provide the Mongolian language students a reference book of English explanations for the Mongolian grammar system. Each area of Grammar is explained in simple English and then several examples are given. There are significant differences between spoken Mongolian and written Mongolian. speakers in Mongolia speak the Khalkha dialect, while those in China speak the Chahar, Oyirad, and Barghu-Buryat dialect groups. Mo ngolian is a Mongolic language.

Keywords: Hindi, comparative study, dialects 1. INTRODUCTION The variations represented by the dialects of a language can be viewed as a sub-set of the diachronic variation of a language. Therefore, a comparative study of the phonetics and phonology of a language can provide valuable insight into. Frederick Holden BUCK, Comparative Study of Postpositions in Mongolian Dialects and the Written Language [= Harvard-Yenching Institute Studies XII], Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, , xvii + pages in 8?. The book reviewed is a careful and thorough study of the post-positions in Mongolian. TATARICA: LANGUAGE 7 `PETER SIMON PALLAS’S WORK “COMPARATIVE DICTIONARIES OF ALL LANGUAGES AND DIALECTS” AND ITS PLACE IN THE STUDY OF TURKIC LANGUAGES AND DIALECTS Erdal Shakhin, Marmara University, Göztepe Campus, Istanbul, Turkey, [email protected] Linguistics - Linguistics - Dialectology and linguistic geography: Dialect study as a discipline—dialectology—dates from the first half of the 19th century, when local dialect dictionaries and dialect grammars first appeared in western Europe. Soon thereafter, dialect maps were developed; most often they depicted the division of a language’s territory into regional dialects.

Mongolian is the principal language spoken by some five million ethnic Mongols living in Outer and Inner Mongolia, as well as in adjacent parts of Russia and China. The spoken language is divided into a number of mutually intelligible dialects, while for writing two separate written languages are used: Cyrillic Khalkha in Outer Mongolia (the Republic of Mongolia) and Written Mongol in Inner. Comparative Study of Postpositions in Mongolian Dialects and the Written Language. By FREDERICK HOLDEN BUCK. Harvard-Yenching Institute Studies, XII. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, xvii, Postpositions in the Mongol dialects and languages must be studied more, both from the descriptive and historico-comparative points of view. Author by: Daniel Elliott Languange: en Publisher by: Createspace Independent Pub Format Available: PDF, ePub, Mobi Total Read: 76 Total Download: File Size: 55,5 Mb Description: This book is written to provide the Mongolian language students a reference book of English explanations for the Mongolian grammar area of Grammar is explained in simple English and then. Part 1, ‘Available theories and data’, begins with an introduction of the domains of child language and the aims of the book. Ch. 2 is a theoretical review of language acquisition, while Ch. 3 highlights some universal vs. language-specific properties of linguistic systems that bear on the developmental issues of language acquisition.